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Temporary Income Benefits (TIBs)

You may be paid temporary income benefits (TIBs) if your work-related injury or illness causes you to lose all or some of your wages for more than seven days.
If you have more than one job, you may be paid TIBs if you lose all or some of your wages from other employers (see multiple employment).

Amount you will receive:

TIBs are equal to 70% of the difference between your average weekly wage and the wages you are able to earn after your work-related injury.

If you earned less than $8.50 per hour before you were injured, and you were injured before September 1, 2015, your TIBs for the first 26 weeks of payments will equal 75% of the difference between your average weekly wage and the wages you are able to earn after your work-related injury.

If you earned less than $10 an hour before you were injured, and you were injured on or after September 1, 2015, your TIBs for the first 26 weeks of payments will equal 75% of the difference between your average weekly wage and the wages you are able to earn after your work-related injury.

TIBs are subject to maximum and minimum amounts.

To find out how much you would receive, call 800-252-7031 Ext. 1.

Modified duty:

After an injury, your doctor may allow you to return to work at modified duty. This might include changes made to your regular job, or a temporary or alternate work assignment.

You may still be entitled to TIBs if your employer provides the modified duty at reduced wages.

When TIBs begin and end:

You become eligible for TIBs after you miss eight days from work. Disability refers to your inability to earn an income, not to a physical handicap. You have disability if your work-related injury or illness causes you to lose all or some of your usual pay. Benefits are not paid for the first week of lost wages unless disability lasts for 14 days or more.

TIBs end at the earlier of:

  • the date you reach maximum medical improvement (the point that your work-related injury or illness has improved as much as it is going to improve),
  • the date you are again physically able to earn your average weekly wage (the same wages you were earning prior to being injured on-the-job), or
  • at the end of 104 weeks from your eighth day of disability.

For more information

Texas Labor Code (TLC) §§ 408 .101 - 408.105
28 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) §§ 129.1 - 129.1

Last updated: 4/13/2018